The Bombay Blood Group: How Rare is It? A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

Main Article Content

Emmanuel Ekanem
Santosh Poozhikalayil
Anita Sinha

Abstract

The Bombay blood group is a rare type of blood group which is very distinct from the ABO system and was first discovered in India about five decades ago. This blood group describes individuals who lack the H antigen and thus present with the anti H antibodies in addition to anti A and anti B antibodies. Bombay blood group is sometimes mistaken for blood group O. The significance of this blood group is in its ability to potentially cause fatal blood transfusion reaction and haemolytic disease of the foetus and the neonate.

Aim: This case report aims to elucidate the rare occurrence of the Bombay blood group.

Methods: We describe a case report of the pregnancy, labour and delivery of a multiparous Indian woman with the Bombay blood group in her second pregnancy.

Results: The index case had an uneventful pregnancy, labour and delivery without the need for blood transfusion. The neonate was Rhesus D positive and did not have any complications.

Conclusion: Bombay blood group is a rare blood group which can lead to blood transfusion reactions and haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn. Pregnancy, labour and delivery should be managed in a unit with the availability of anti H blood to avoid foetal and maternal complications.

Keywords:
Bombay, OH phenotype, blood group, haemolytic disease of the newborn and foetus.

Article Details

How to Cite
Ekanem, E., Poozhikalayil, S., & Sinha, A. (2020). The Bombay Blood Group: How Rare is It? A Case Report and a Review of the Literature. Journal of Advances in Medicine and Medical Research, 32(7), 24-29. https://doi.org/10.9734/jammr/2020/v32i730445
Section
Case Report

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